Incredible Pocket Sized Tripod : The Manfrotto 3007 Kit

Web: @flyingwithfish — E-Mail: fish@flyingwithfish.com

23/04/2008 – Incredible Pocket Sized Tripod : The Manfrotto 3007 Kit

After posting about the Ultrapod II in mid-February, on Flying With Fish, I received quite a few messages asking me if I had tried the Manfrotto 3007 tabletop tripod. In the weeks following my post the folks at Bogen/Manfrotto sent me the complete Manfrotto 3007 kit, including the 3007 Tabletop Tripod, 482 Mini-Ballhead, 3007x Extension Post and Bogen 345 Bag to test out and take on the road.

Since late March I have been using my Manfrotto 3007 kit extensively on trips throughout the United States and around the world. I initially used the 3007 as a hidden light stand on engagement sessions shoots in Philadelphia, San Francisco and later a bridal session in Hong Kong; and I also used the 3007 for a series of industrial architecture shoots in in the past few weeks in Philadelphia, Frankfurt, Incheon and New York City. I have to say that I love this pocket sized tripod!

The Manfrotto 3007 is very different than the Ultrapod II and they seem to do two very different jobs in my kit set up. I have been able to find unique uses for both tripods, but overall the Manfrotto 3007 is extremely versatile, very compact, exceedingly easy to travel with and able to withstand a significant weight load stably at unusual angles.

Any compact tripod can double as a compact light stand, this is fairly easy. I often place a small light behind my subjects for some added backlight, and the Manfrotto 3007’s unique auxiliary extension post, that adds approximately 6-to-10 inches is great for fine tuning the secondary back light in tight spaces.

The real test of any compact tripod is to be able to stably hold the weight of a full-size camera with a heavy lens. Throughout my projects I have used the Manfrotto 3007 and the 482 mini-ballhead to hold a Canon 5D, with BG-E4 grip, with some heavy lenses, including the Canon 14f2.8,16-35f2.8, 24f1.4 and 24f3.5 tilt-shift at some very precise angles for some long exposures. Some shots were made with the 3007x extension post, others without, either way the tripod and the head held these heavy camera/lens combinations flawlessly.

I don’t think I could have ever imagined using such a compact, lightweight, tripod for such precise work with the sets ups I was using in the past. The full range ball-head gives top notch profession precision and flexibility, while the overall kit can be disassembled and easily carried in your back pocket (not that I suggest trying to sit down with a disassembled tripod in your back pocket).

While the supplied carry-case is not my ideal design, it does it’s job. Two individual slots hold the tripod with head and the extension post separately. This makes the ultra-quick set up and tear down easy. The belt loop on the back is perfect for attaching to any belt system,or lashing it onto a bag such as the Mountainsmith Tour or the Newswear belt system.

At approximately US$80 for the complete kit, I can’t see why anyone wouldn’t add the Manfrotto 3007 to their kit!

Below are two photos of my Canon 5D w/24f1.4 attached to the Manfrotto 3007 while shooting the Incheon Transportation Center, in Incheon, South Korea. Along with these two photos is a photo shot from this set up.

Happy Flying!

–Click Images To Enlarge Them–

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Comments

  1. Brian

    I have looked at the Cullmann table-top tripod more than once and find the design not only a bit awkward,but difficult to pack. The Cullmann does take up a small packed footprint, but it’s ability to be very low profile seems to be larger than I’d like.

    I am not against this tripods, I am sure they are very good, they just aren’t best for my needs.

    Happy Flying

    -Fish

  2. Yea no biggy, the large one does pack small but is clunky.

    I do like the manfrotto table-top over any others out there.

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