The Pelican 1514 Case, Would You Drive A Truck Over It? I Would!

Web: www.stevenfrischling.com — E-Mail: fish@flyingwithfish.com

16/04/2009 – The Pelican 1514 Case, Would You Drive A Truck Over It? I Would!

I have frequently been asked about the durability of traveling with my Pelican 1514 case over the past few years. These questions come from not only having discussed this case on Flying With Fish, but through my frequent recommendations for the case on various forums on the internet.

Since writing about the Pelican 1514 yesterday on Flying With Fish, in this entry : 15/04/2009 – The Pelican 1514 Case : A Bag You Can Checked Under The Plane & Know Your Gear Is Safe In , I received more than two dozen e-mails asking me how much abuse I though the case could withstand.

Last night I reviewed some content online produced by Pelican regarding the strength of their cases, but decided it was best to create a demonstration of my own.  I wondered if I could get an airline to let me toss a Pelican 1514 from the back of a plane on the ramp along with some other ideas. Eventually after looking up the estimated weight of a Chevy 1500 Series Pickup, at just over 4,500lbs (2041kg), I decided to ask my friend Rich if he’d drive his Chevy 1500 Series pickup truck over my Pelican case.

After Rich pulled his full-size work pickup truck into the street he asked me if I really wanted to drive the truck over my Pelican case, and I said “Yes.”  Once we decided we were going to drive over the case we made a ‘ladder’ for the wheel to drive up from some bricks, we were ready to go.

First the truck drove over the Pelican 1514 forwards, and then the case was immediately backed over moments later. Both times, the Chevy1500 Series pickup truck was stopped for a moment directly in top of the case to see what would happen.

In the end, after being driven over twice…the Pelican 1514 is in PEFECT SHAPE!  No cracks, no damage, a few scuffs,

So for the photographers, videograpghers, IT professionals, out there who have been seeking concrete evidence that a Pelican case can survive the wear-and-tear of hard travel, and nearly any abuse an airline ramp agent can inflict on your case, I offer you photographic proof of the cases durability.

Below are 10 photos in sequence of my Pelican 1514 being driven over by an approximately 4,500 (2041kg) pickup truck, before, during and after the strength test.

Happy Flying!
–Click Images Below To Enlarge–

Pingbacks

  1. […] Keep in mind that “ignorance is not bliss”…the risks exist regardless of whether you talk about them or not so it’s better to talk about them. The best you can do is make sure everybody understands them, help figure out what the practical options are, and help carry out the agreed-upon solution. November 6, 2009 2:49 am Nic Those cases are exactly what I was looking for, but GregD’s answer makes me wonder if I am even asking the right question. The chain of custody is just me. I like the buddy suggestion. November 6, 2009 5:25 am damorg You can only do what you can do…if your company can’t or won’t vault with a bonded offsite operation, it limits the possible solutions. I’ll edit my answer above with some additional thoughts. November 6, 2009 11:59 am GregD +1 for suggesting a safe deposit box November 6, 2009 4:43 am Kamil Kisiel I highly recommend Pelican cases. They’re virtually indestructible, and waterproof, they even float if dropped in the water. I don’t currently use them for tapes but have done so in the past. I’ve also used them for photography equipment. You can even drive a truck over it. […]

Comments

  1. I think this test would have been more impressive if you had the front end of the truck(where the heavy engine is) rolling over the Pelican case instead of the empty rear cargo area.

  2. Benjamin,

    The person driving (Rich) chose to use the back of the truck so he could keep the door open and see where he was driving over the bricks. He didn’t want to miss the bricks and drag the case. It was entirely his call and his comfort level.

    According to the folks at GM I spoke to, the back of the pick up would exert 2,000lbs+ (907kgs+) of downward pressure from the rear wheels. I am satisfied with 2,000+ of downward pressure. I am not sure of the total weight, which is calculated by tires, fuel (he had a full tank) and the weight of the contents in the bed.

    It was not a scientific test, just one to demonstrate the durability of the case

    Happy Flying!

    -Fish

  3. Pelican cases rock. My experience has been great too. Aside from being tough as nails, here is something that needs to be noted about Pelican as a company. I recently had two Pelican cases break. The first one was a 18 year old that was “shattered” by AA, the other was a 1 year old that was cracked by FedEx. In both events, the case did it’s job and protected it’s gear. Pelican replaced both cases without a question. They even tossed in a flashlight since I came to the factory to exchange the busted cases. What a company!

  4. Okay, as interesting as this science experiment is… This is what you two do while I am working away in the office?!
    You could have cleaned my living room in this amount of time…

  5. Melissa,

    If it makes you feel any better, Rich was inside fixing the bathroom sink and cleaning the living room when I arrived. I stormed in and demanded that he drive over my Pelican 1514 with the pickup. Rich protested that he had to stay in and clean the house…but I forced him to get the keys to the truck and perform the experiment against his will!

    That’s how I remember it happening!

    -Fish

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